Help...Proper rotory techniques

opie

Member
Hey mike. I have some seat time behind a rotory(my flex pe14-2). Not enough time though to be confident in everything im doing. *side note...this is not my day job*. Most things i do usually only require my supa beast, meaning most of my work usually comes from a friend whom has a body shop, which on certain projects (mostly semi tractors) i will come in to do the final polish to get that finshed look after he paints, sands/buffs out. Also, i never was tought in person, only learning from old videos/articles that you have done over the years that i have been able to find and my hands on experiences.

My latest project is what has lead me to make this thread. I just finished cleaning up a black peterbuilt that had be painted 10 years ago and has since been only washed with a pole brush. So it was hammered. It was in for a repaint of part of sleeper from damage and new fenders and such.

So most of the truck was left to me to compound then polish. Asked for it to be cleaned up to freshen up(not to be a show truck).
Tool list...
Flex rotary, aca510, rupes blue twisted wool pads
Flex supa beast, aat505, lc force white polishing pad.
For freah repainted parts i used same supa beast and white pad only swaping the abrasive for aat502.

Sorry for the long story, but felt needed to give that info before my questions 😂.

I imagine it depends, but general rule of thumb on how much pressure to apply with rotory for compounding something like this?

Also rule of thumb for how many passes? Anything past 3-4 passes did not make a difference. Also to note that rids were still left on old painted surface as i believe only dry sanding was going to remove those deepest defects.

Are my "buffer trails" a normal look for this step..or am i using improper techniques?

In the end i want to be confident that im doing everything right and doing best work i can as fast and efficiently. I dont want to drag out forever as ya wont make a profit working like that.

Thanks for any assistance and constructive criticism!
Test spot B4 and after compound aca510 20230116_175413.jpg
test spot after aat505 20230116_175834.jpg compound 510 20230116_205251.jpg polish 505 20230116_205257.jpg polish 505 20230118_184207.jpg
 

Mike Phillips

Global Director of Training
Staff member
My latest project is what has lead me to make this thread. I just finished cleaning up a black peterbuilt that had be painted 10 years ago and has since been only washed with a pole brush. So it was hammered. It was in for a repaint of part of sleeper from damage and new fenders and such.

Here's my thoughts...

If after you detail this Peterbuilt Truck it's going to get the same care - that is washed with Pole Brush - then don't aim for perfection in the first place because all your hard work is simply going to be undone.

Get it good - not perfect.


I imagine it depends, but general rule of thumb on how much pressure to apply with rotary for compounding something like this?

If you're confident there's plenty of paint to work with, then medium to hard pressure with a slow speed to medium arm speed. . Assuming you're using a quality compound. :)


Also rule of thumb for how many passes? Anything past 3-4 passes did not make a difference. Also to note that rids were still left on old painted surface as i believe only dry sanding was going to remove those deepest defects.

Kind of sounds like hard paint? The number of passes required simply comes down to buffing until the defects are removed to your satisfaction.


Are my "buffer trails" a normal look for this step..or am i using improper techniques?

Yes.


In the end i want to be confident that im doing everything right and doing best work i can as fast and efficiently. I dont want to drag out forever as ya wont make a profit working like that.

Watch this see if you pick up any tips...






Mike
 

opie

Member
Watch this see if you pick up any tips...






Mike
I think i may have seen that video but i cant rememeber as you have put out alot of content that i have watched recently. I will watch or rewatch to fuel my brain with as much info as i can lol.

You are correct, my thought was the same as you said, aim for good but not perfect.

Your answers reassures me i was doing things correctly, room for improvement as always but in the correct direction.

Yes it seemed like hard paint, just no matter the pressure/speed i could only do so much.

aca 510 continues to server me well, along with every other 3d abrasive. I had 500 and liked it but ran out. Once i ran out of it i wanted to try 510, and have been running it since. After i run out of 502 im going to try out 520.

Loving the 505, especially for after rotory work, cleaning up the haze. Have tested 505 on fresh paint for a final polish, since its a product that can be used in a faster buffing cycle method, but had to fall back to 502, had found a tick better correction results from sticking with a true straight polish.

Thanks again for your time and insight. I know this info you gave was "free" info. But i will continue to stock my majority of my supplies with 3D products👍🏻
 
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